BioGalleries The Ciliates
Ciliates Gallery
Written by Eric Russell
Investigate the biology of these organisms by holding the cursor over each image. Scroll down for more information and links.
Blepharisma
Blepharisma
Large Ciliate - Bursaria
Large Ciliate - Bursaria
Ciliate
Ciliate
Ciliate
Ciliate
Coleps
Coleps
Didnium is a small but fierce predator that captures and engulfs Paramecium
Didnium
Dileptus
Dileptus
Euplotes Nucleus
Euplotes Nucleus
Euplotes Cirri
Euplotes Cirri
Euplotes
Euplotes
Lacrameria has a long highly flexible probing neck
Lacrameria CU
Parameciuim Bursaria
Parameciuim Bursaria
Some species of Stentor live in colonies
Stentor
Strobolidium
Strobolidium
Suctorian Birth
Suctorian Birth
Suctorian Feeding
Suctorian Feeding
Trichodina scurries over the surface of Hydra tentacles
Trichodina
Vorticella, a colonial ciliate attached by a long stalk
Vorticella
The stalk of Vorticella can be rapidly coiled to pull Vorticella out of danger
Vorticella
In Paramecium and other ciliates contractile vacuoles function to expel excess water
Paramecium

The Ciliated Protists - Phylum Ciliophora

This Gallery is about amazing story of the world's most complex cells - cells that are complete organisms - cells with fascinating behaviors including a unique type of sexual reproduction. Many ciliates are larger than a great number of multicellular organisms, such as rotifers, that share their watery environments. You can easily see species such as Stentor, Spirostomum or Bursaria if you have them in a jar of pondwater - even without the aid of a microscope.

In this gallery, we will explain how cilia work, and we'll demonstrate ciliate feeding and escape behaviors. We'll examine Ciliate anatomy and we'll show how one predator ciliate, Didinium, captures and engulfs another ciliate, Paramecium, even though the prey is larger than the predator. We'll explore the diversity of ciliates, and look at the behaviors and biology of many of the classic ciliated protists, including Stentor, Vorticella, Paramecium, Bursaria, Blepharisma , and Euplotes.

Click here to learn about the diet of ciliates.


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